CensusMapper

Mythical oversupply

Going back to the 'supply myth' well.

Jens von Bergmann

20 minute read

regular vs recalibrated surplus

It’s been over two years now since the news media reported on John Rose claiming that Vancouver has a surplus of housing and Rose shared his Working Paper, Version 1 detailing his claims of some mythical oversupply of housing in Vancouver. We have written about this on several occasions, but we were missing a piece of data that can greatly simplify our arguments: Cross-tabulations of structural type by document type (whether a dwelling was occupied by usual residents, or occupied by temporarily present persons, or unoccupied) for the censuses 2001-2016.

Unoccupied dwellings data

A publicly available xtab for Structural type by Document type.

Jens von Bergmann

6 minute read

Cities like Vancouver and Toronto talk a lot about unoccupied dwellings. We have a whole category for empty homes themed posts on this blog. Do we need one more? Probably not, except that we were able to open up an empty-homes related cross-tabulation that we needed through current work for CMHC. Yay, and big thanks to CMHC for making this available to the general public. Open data FTW! Possibly more useful is the classification of the entire building stock by structural type that this data contains, when in the past many have used the classification of the stock occupied by usual residents as a proxy that comes with the standard release census data.

Flow Maps

Fun with flow maps.

Jens von Bergmann

2 minute read

Just came across this excellent flow map tool that takes a google sheet and turns it into an interactive flow map. It’s super-easy to use, here is a quick demo. We are using the commuting flow data between census subdivisions from the 2016 census. First we load the required libraries library(tidyverse) library(cancensus) #remotes::install_github("mountainmath/statcanXtabs") library(statcanXtabs) library(sf) library(googlesheets4) Next we create the google sheet for our flow map. It comes with three sheets, one defining overall properties, one defining the locations and one for the flows.

Commuter growth

As our population and jobs grow, so do commuters. Taking a look how commuters grow.

Jens von Bergmann

7 minute read

Metro Vancouver is growing, both in terms of population and jobs. That means the number of people commuting to work is growing and putting a strain on our transportation system. The nature of that strain depends to a large extent on how people are getting to and from work. The Canadian census started collecting data on how people get to work in 1996, which allows us to see how commuters and commute choice have changed over time.

Census custom timelines

Playing with fine geography custom tabulation back to 1971.

Jens von Bergmann

5 minute read

After our recent posts on multi-census comparisons I was pointed to a semi-custom tabulation for census timelines back to 1971 for Vancouver and Toronto. That’s data for the 1971, 1981, 1986, 1991, 1996, 2001, 2006 and 2011 censuses on a common 2016 DA geography for the two CMAs. This is really cool, not just that it eliminates the need to tongfen the geographies, but in particular because Statistics Canada does not even haven publicly available geographic boundary files for censuses before 2001.