Transportation

Behaviour change in response to COVID-19

Looking into real-time metrics to measure behaviour change.

Jens von Bergmann

10 minute read

With COVID-19 cases growing exponentially, Canada has introduced sweeping restrictions to curb the spread of the virus. People are asked to practice social distancing, work from home if possible, keep shopping trips to a minimum, keep a distance of at least 6 feet to people outside of their household, universities and schools have been closed, and travel has been restricted. Why social distancing? Just in case it’s not clear what the problem is, let’s take a look at the trajectory we are currently on.

Overnight Visitors and Crude Travel Vectors

Checking in on Vancouver travel data. And the novel corona virus.

Jens von Bergmann

8 minute read

(Joint with Nathan Lauster and cross-posted at HomeFreeSociology) The spread of Coronavirus is reminding us of just how often people travel around, especially as various locations become quarantined and international travel corridors get shut down. So let’s take a look at some basic data on travel patterns here of relevance to us here in Vancouver. Then we’ll put them back in the context of Coronavirus. TLDR: travel data is really interesting, don’t be frightened of travellers, and there’s still a lot we don’t know about coronavirus

Flow Maps

Fun with flow maps.

Jens von Bergmann

2 minute read

Just came across this excellent flow map tool that takes a google sheet and turns it into an interactive flow map. It’s super-easy to use, here is a quick demo. We are using the commuting flow data between census subdivisions from the 2016 census. First we load the required libraries library(tidyverse) library(cancensus) #remotes::install_github("mountainmath/statcanXtabs") library(statcanXtabs) library(sf) library(googlesheets4) Next we create the google sheet for our flow map. It comes with three sheets, one defining overall properties, one defining the locations and one for the flows.

Fun with parking tickets

Looking for excuses to showcase my {VancouvR} R package to access Vancouver Open Data.

Jens von Bergmann

8 minute read

Almost three years ago I ran the numbers to identify “Vancouver’s most lucrative fire hydrant”. Behold, Vancouver's most lucrative fire hydrant. 815 tickets issued in 7 years. Red curb markings might be advisable. Data via @VanOpenData pic.twitter.com/j4Po9UpiCc — Jens von Bergmann (@vb_jens) February 1, 2017 Being a card-carrying Shoupista it’s high time for me to do an update. And looking back I can’t help but realize how my approach to data analysis, even about such trivial things as parking tickets, has changed since then.

Commuter growth

As our population and jobs grow, so do commuters. Taking a look how commuters grow.

Jens von Bergmann

7 minute read

Metro Vancouver is growing, both in terms of population and jobs. That means the number of people commuting to work is growing and putting a strain on our transportation system. The nature of that strain depends to a large extent on how people are getting to and from work. The Canadian census started collecting data on how people get to work in 1996, which allows us to see how commuters and commute choice have changed over time.