Vancouver

Fun with parking tickets

Looking for excuses to showcase my {VancouvR} R package to access Vancouver Open Data.

Jens von Bergmann

8 minute read

Almost three years ago I ran the numbers to identify “Vancouver’s most lucrative fire hydrant”. Behold, Vancouver's most lucrative fire hydrant. 815 tickets issued in 7 years. Red curb markings might be advisable. Data via @VanOpenData pic.twitter.com/j4Po9UpiCc — Jens von Bergmann (@vb_jens) February 1, 2017 Being a card-carrying Shoupista it’s high time for me to do an update. And looking back I can’t help but realize how my approach to data analysis, even about such trivial things as parking tickets, has changed since then.

Property tax snacks

A short post munching through some property tax musings.

Jens von Bergmann Nathan Lauster

5 minute read

(Joint with Nathan Lauster and cross-posted at HomeFreeSociology) Property Tax Snacks Residential Property Taxes have been rising in Vancouver. As always, we’re seeing a lot of sturm and drang about the rise. But we think it’s ultimately a good thing. Why? Here’s three perspectives. From a fiscal perspective, property taxes pool our resources to enable our government to pursue projects and provide for the common good. They’re a big component of how we take care of each other and set priorities.

Canadian Housing Survey

Taking a first look at the new Canadian Housing Survey data

Jens von Bergmann

4 minute read

The long awaited first batch of data from the Canadian Housing Survey came out yesterday. The Canadian Housing Survey (CHS) is a new survey that aims give a better idea of well housing needs of Canadians are met. Right now there are four tables publicly available, and we will give a quick tour of what’s out there, with a focus on Metro Vancouver, Toronto, Montréal and Calgary. This post is meant as a quick overview of what’s available right now, the code is available on GitHub for anyone that wants to explore this further.

Commuter growth

As our population and jobs grow, so do commuters. Taking a look how commuters grow.

Jens von Bergmann

7 minute read

Metro Vancouver is growing, both in terms of population and jobs. That means the number of people commuting to work is growing and putting a strain on our transportation system. The nature of that strain depends to a large extent on how people are getting to and from work. The Canadian census started collecting data on how people get to work in 1996, which allows us to see how commuters and commute choice have changed over time.

Rents and incomes

In Vancouver (both City or Metro), median rents have tracked median incomes quite well. (Although some misleading information that is making the rounds suggests otherwise.)

Jens von Bergmann

6 minute read

Following up on our previous post on rents and vacancy rates there is another rental stat originating from City of Vancouver documents that is making the rounds and that is misleading. Again, our housing crisis is fundamentally a rental crisis, so it’s important to keep the numbers straight so that we can better focus our energy and resources. This one is a bit more serious, but still has been making the rounds quite broadly on social media.