COVID deaths in context by weeks

An updated view at covid-19 mortality and excess mortality.

Jens von Bergmann Nathan Lauster

5 minute read

(Joint with Nathan Lauster and cross-posted at HomeFreeSociology) In our previous post on COVID mortality in context, we tried to place COVID deaths, as recorded so far this year, in the context of expected deaths from previous years. There have been a lot more developments since that post. And unfortunately a lot more deaths too. Here we’re providing an update to our previous post, but also expanding on that post by talking a bit more about new mortality analyses and the progression of outbreaks in terms of expected deaths on a weekly basis.

Covid-19 data in Canada

Covid-19 data for Canada is hard to come by. Where to get the data, what it tells us and what's missing.

Jens von Bergmann

5 minute read

With social distancing and travel restrictions in full swing in Canada, everyone wants to know if it’s working. And when and how we can start to loosen some of the restrictions. To answer these questions we need data. Canada has been extremely slow to make covid-19 related data available, only at the end of March did Canada get official government dataset for confirmed case counts and deaths by province and date.

Context for Covid-19 mortality so far

Covid-19 related deaths are mounting,

Jens von Bergmann

5 minute read

(Joint with Nathan Lauster and cross-posted at HomeFreeSociology) Unfortunately, more and more people are dying due to COVID-19. We won’t know the full toll from COVID-19 for quite some time. But we can at least start to get a sense of its impact. One useful way of assessing the impact, of course, is just to plot deaths attributed to COVID-19. This highlights the real loss of human lives associated with outbreaks.

Behaviour change in response to COVID-19

Looking into real-time metrics to measure behaviour change.

Jens von Bergmann

10 minute read

With COVID-19 cases growing exponentially, Canada has introduced sweeping restrictions to curb the spread of the virus. People are asked to practice social distancing, work from home if possible, keep shopping trips to a minimum, keep a distance of at least 6 feet to people outside of their household, universities and schools have been closed, and travel has been restricted. Why social distancing? Just in case it’s not clear what the problem is, let’s take a look at the trajectory we are currently on.

Knock Knock, Anybody Home?

Empty Homes Taxes can be useful, but let's keep the numbers and expectations straight.

Nathan Lauster Jens von Bergmann

7 minute read

(Joint with Nathan Lauster and cross-posted at HomeFreeSociology) Empty homes are in the news again in West Vancouver after a West Vancouver council motion asking the province for the power to levy their own Speculation and Vacancy tax. THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED THAT the Provincial Government provide local governments with the power to levy their own Speculation and Vacancy Tax, so that they too can address housing affordability and other community effects of vacant homes.